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ECI 2018 Keynote lecturers

Judi Allen

Keynote lecture: CO-ORDINATION OF THE LOCAL AND SYSTEMIC IMMUNE RESPONSE TO INFECTION AND INJURY

Session: Monday September 3, 2018; 12:00-12:45

Judi Allen obtained her PhD from the University of California, Berkeley following several years in the Biotech Industry. Judi moved to Imperial College, London for her postdoc where she began work on the immune response to helminths, which as remained the focus of her research career. In 1997, Judi established her own group at the University of Edinburgh with an MRC Senior Fellowship and became Professor of Immunobiology in 2005.  Recently, Judi joined the Faculty of Biology, Medicine & Health at the University of Manchester.  Judi is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Biology, the Royal Society of Edinburgh and the Academy of Medical Sciences.  She is best known for her work on the biology of macrophages in the context of macroparasite infection and is particularly interested in the relationship of type 2 immunity to wound repair pathways.


Tasuku Honjo

Keynote lecture: SERENDIPITIES OF ACQUIRED IMMUNITY

Session: Sunday September 2, 2018; 15:30-16:15

Dr. Honjo is well known for his discovery of activation-induced cytidine deaminase that is essential for class switch recombination and somatic hypermutation. He has established the basic conceptual framework of class switch recombination. In addition, he discovered PD-1 (program cell death 1), a negative coreceptor at the effector phase of immune response and showed that PD-1 modulation contributes to treatments of tumor, viral infection and autoimmunity. For these contributions, Dr. Honjo has received many awards, including Imperial Prize, Japan Academy Prize, Robert Koch Prize, Order of Culture, the Tang Prize, William B. Coley Award, Richard V. Smalley, MD Memorial Award, the Kyoto Prize, the Keio Medical Science Prize, Warren Alpert Foundation Prize and Japan Bioindustry Award. Elected as a foreign associate of National Academy of Sciences, USA, as a member of the German Academy of Natural Scientists, and also as a member of Japan Academy.


Adrian Liston

Keynote lecture: REGULATORY T CELL HOMEOSTASIS

Session: Tuesday September 4, 2018; 12:00-12:45

Adrian Liston is Professor of Translational Immunology at the University of Leuven and the VIB, Belgium. The laboratory works on both aspects of discovery immunology (identifying intervention-points in regulatory T cell biology; developing diabetes pre-clinical models) and applied immunology (human immunology; immunogenetics; and mechanisms of immunodeficiency and inflammatory disease). He has been awarded the Francqui Chair, Eppendorf prize and two ERC grants, among other honours.

His PhD research was on T cell tolerance and diabetes with Professor Chris Goodnow at the Australian National University, followed by post-doctoral research on regulatory T cell biology with Professor Sasha Rudensky at the University of Washington. In 2009 Adrian was invited to set up an independent research laboratory at the VIB and the University of Leuve


Mihai Netea

Keynote lecture: TRAINED IMMUNITY: REPROGRAMMING INNATE IMMUNITY TO PROTECT AGAINST INFECTIONS

Session: Sunday September 2, 2018; 15:30-16:15

Mihai Netea was born and studied medicine in Cluj-Napoca, Romania. He completed his PhD at the Radboud University Nijmegen, The Netherlands, on studies investigating the cytokine network in sepsis. After working as a post-doc at the University of Colorado, he returned to Nijmegen where he finished his clinical training as an infectious diseases specialist, and where he currently heads the division of Experimental Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Nijmegen University Nijmegen Medical Center. He is mainly interested in understanding the factors influencing variability of human immune responses, the biology of sepsis and immunoparalysis, and the study of the memory traits of innate immunity. 


Erika Pearce

Keynote lecture: T-CELL METABOLISM

Session: Tuesday September 4, 2018; 12:00-12:45

Dr. Pearce completed her doctoral training at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, focusing on the regulation of T cell responses during infection. She continued her postdoctoral studies at the University of Pennsylvania and it was during this time she began her research into how cellular metabolic processes govern the immune response to infection and cancer. In 2009 Dr. Pearce began her independent research career as an Assistant Member at the Trudeau Institute in Saranac Lake, NY. In 2011 she joined the faculty at Washington University in St. Louis and was promoted to Associate Professor in 2014. In September 2015, Dr. Pearce became a Director at the Max Planck Institute for Immunobiology and Epigenetics in Freiburg, Germany and Head of the Department of Immunometabolism. Her research continues to investigate the metabolic pathways in immune cells with a view to targeting these pathways for therapy.


Andreas Radbruch

Keynote lecture: CHALLENGES AND PERSPECTIVES IN CONTROL OF ANTIBODY FORMATION

Session: Wednesday September 5, 2018; 15:45-16:30

Andreas Radbruch, a biologist by education, is Director of the German Rheumatism Research Center in Berlin, a Leibniz Institute, and Professor of Rheumatology at the Charité Medical Center and Humboldt University of Berlin. Andreas Radbruch developed a line of research aiming at a molecular understanding of immune reactions and immunological memory. He described the organization of memory plasma cells and memory T helper (Th) lymphocytes in bone marrow, and identified memory plasma cells secreting pathogenic antibodies as novel target in chronic immune-mediated diseases. Andreas Radbruch has received various scientific awards and honors, most notably the Carol Nachman Prize for Rheumatology (2011), an Advanced Grant of the European Research Council (ERC, 2010), and  the 2014 Avery Landsteiner Award.  Andreas Radbruch sits on numerous advisory boards and councils. He has been Presidents of the German Society for Rheumatology and the German Society for Immunology. Since 2016, he has been President elect of the European Federation of Immunological Societies (EFIS).


Francisco Sánchez-Madrid

Keynote lecture: CENTROSOMES AND EXOSOMES: MOLECULAR PACEMAKERS OF IMMUNE SYNAPSE AND T CELL ACTIVATION

Session: Monday September 3, 2018; 12:00-12:45

Francisco Sánchez-Madrid has made leading contributions to knowledge about the mechanisms of leukocyte adhesion, polarity, migration and activation. This contribution has pioneered the identification and characterization of the first families of leukocyte adhesion molecules, their physiological role in the control of migration and cellular traffic, and their immense relevance to chronic inflammatory pathologies. His laboratory research on migration and activation receptors of human leukocytes is documented in more than 400 publications in international journals, including many recent articles in prestigious journals that have to date received more than 27.000 citations.In the most recent years, his research group has made contributions to understanding the functional relevance of the supra-molecular organization of leukocyte and endothelial nano-platforms connected to cytoskeleton in the regulation of cell-to-cell communication in the immune system and the mechanisms of transfer of genetic information.


Laurence Zitvogel 

Keynote lecture: MICROBIOTA AND CANCER THERAPEUTICS

Session: Wednesday September 5, 2018; 15:45-16:30

Pr L. Zitvogel, MD (clinical oncology), PhD (tumor immunology), PU-PH Faculty Paris Sud, University Paris XI (Clinical Biology), graduated in Medical Oncology from the School of Medicine of the University of Paris in 1992. She started her scientific career when she was at the University of Pittsburgh in the USA in Michael Lotze’s laboratory. She became Research Director at Institut National de la Santé et Recherche Médicale U1015, and Scientific Director of the Immuno-Oncology programm at Gustave Roussy, the largest cancer Center in Europe. She has been actively contributing to the field of cancer immunology and immunotherapy, and she brought together basic and translational research, including the design of cancer therapies through combined animal studies and Phase I/II patient trials. Her expertise is mainly dendritic cell and innate effector biology and relevance during tumour development as well as exosome-based vaccine designs. She pioneered the concept of immunogenic cell death and showed that chemotherapy, radiotherapy and inhibitors of tyrosine kinase mediate their tumoricidal activity, at least partly through the immune system. Her team discovered the critical role and impact of gut microbiota in cancer immunosurveillance and therapies. She was the recipient of many awards including the National Academy of Medicine, the Translation Research INSERM Prize, the ASCO-SITC, the Brupbacher Awards 2017 and the ESMO Immuno-Oncology Award 2017 .